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Cupping

Cupping Is Hot

Everyone is excited about cupping, and with good reason, because it is an excellent modality to ease sore and achy muscles. Fire cupping is the process of using fire to create a vacuum within a glass cup which is placed on the body to provide therapeutic benefit. Cupping is usually done on the back, but can be applied to other locations of the body.

cupping_annistan      cupping-athletes      olypian_cupped      phelps_cupped

Check out some of these images from the Olympics. Cupping is hot partly because of the publicity they are giving it. The large marks it leaves as part of the healing process are bold statements worn by athletes and celebrities.

What Is It?

There are two main types of cupping, stationary and sliding, each type has a different emphasis. Stationary cupping means that the cup is placed on the body and left there for about 5-10 minutes, without moving it. Stationary cupping is primarily used as a method to stimulate acupuncture points on the back, it may also be using in conjunction with acupuncture (the cup is placed over a needle which has already been inserted into an acupuncture point). Sliding cupping is the process of placing a cup on the location of treatment and moving it around along the acupuncture channels of the back with brief periods of leaving it in place to provide extra stimulation on various acupuncture points.

Why Do It?

Cupping is valuable because it is a method that helps to loosen the facial layer, which is the first step in preparing the body to do deeper muscle work. Cupping increases circulation in the area being worked on. This increase of circulation helps the body to eliminate toxins from the muscle layer, as well as oxygenating the cells, and increasing the rate of tissue repair. The pinyin (English pronunciation of Mandarin) calls these toxins “sha”. “Sha” literally can be translated as muscle gravel. This muscle gravel creates pain, stiffness, fatigue, and limited range of motion. By bringing these toxins to the surface and inducing the body to fully process and remove them, pain decreases, muscles loosen up, range of motion is increased, and energy is increased.

How Cupping Fits Into An Acupuncture Treatment

Usually some general massage or Tui Na (massage focused on acupuncture channels and points) is done before cupping. Tui Na warms the muscles up, so that they are prepared for the deeper work of cupping. Tui Na also provides an opportunity to work some massage oil into the skin, making it easier for the cups to glide across the surface of the body. As it is utilized in Chinese Medicine, cupping is often considered an accessory technique. Acupuncture, dietary therapy, and herbal therapy are the primary tools of regulating the health of the body, everything else is added to strengthen and support these primary modalities. Cupping is an ancient and powerful tool for healing. It is also easily accessible.

 

Jocelyn, our Acupuncturist, is trained in fire cupping. She has office hours in Colby and Marshfield. If you have questions or would like to experience cupping for yourself, it is just a phone call away!

Wisdom of The Wood Element: Flex

Metaphor of Wood

The wood element is associated with all plant life, but its archetypal symbol is most closely associated with the tree. The vertical line of the tree serves as a connecting point between heaven and earth. The roots and branches of the tree are often mirror like images of each other (roots connecting to earth, branches reaching to heaven, and trunk linking them both). The wood element represent the internal map of destiny that each individual is born with. Wood is often associated with goals and the forward movement needed to reach those goals. The wood time of life are our growing years which include all of our childhood and our early adulthood. This is the time in life when we are discovering who me are in the world and what our purpose is.

Wood and Emotion

The emotions most closely related with wood element are anger and frustration. Wood wants to grow and expand and push past boundaries (think about deep penetrating roots or outreaching vines). Wood hates to be confined. Wood is compelled to take risks, accomplish goals, take initiative, meet challenges, and stay busy. When Wood encounters obstacles it can both become flexible and adapt, or it becomes rigid and immoveable. When things get in the way, wood reacts with anger and or frustration. Anger is often a signal that one has reached the end of a boundary line and or that someone or something has crossed one’s boundary. When Wood is not able to reach its goal and feel a sense of accomplishment it is agitated, irritated, and frustrated.

Wood’s Biggest Strength

The strength and power or wood is that of expansion. Think of a pioneer setting out to experience new lands that have never been charted before. It is like the Star Trek motto, “to boldly go where no man has gone before.” When wood is out of balance, it becomes domineering: attempting to take over and control things. “Bossy” is a good way to think about out of balance Wood. People with excessive Wood often sound as though they are shouting. If Wood gets too far out of balance the energy becomes compressed as though the person is in a pressure cooker that is volatile and ready to explode at any moment.

Wood Asks

• What do I do, what are my goals?
• How do I accomplish my goals, what is my strategy?
• Am I accomplishing my goals or feeling frustrated?
• Do I need to change my current strategies/
• Am I trespassing on others boundaries or allowing them to trespass my boundaries?
• In what areas of my life do I need to establish or reinforce my boundaries?
• Am I angry on a consistent basis? If so, what is fueling this anger?
• What areas of my life need a fresh vision and forward movement?

Moving Forward With Flexibility

• Nourish the Wood element by getting out and taking a walk in the woods. The forward movement of walking accompanied by the surrounding vegetation, especially trees, will bring stimulation and balance to the wood element.
• Bring wooded objects, furniture, or petrified wood crystals into your life.
• Sit down and write down your goals and your strategy for accomplishing those goals
• Say no to people and things that are not in line with your purpose, life mission, and goals
• Be accepting of other people’s boundaries when they say “no” to you

Acupuncture Now Available

Acupuncture Services Begin This October

We are pleased to announce that Acupuncture services will begin at Back To Bliss’ Colby location this October. It has been a goal of Back To Bliss’ to bring acupuncture to our area for some time now so that we can have local access to this amazingly beneficial therapy. Our mission is to make real wellness locally accessible and affordable to maintain, and we feel that adding acupuncture to our service menu does both of these things for our rural area. We are delighted to have connected with a skilled acupuncturist who shares our philosophies on customer service and quality care. Our acupuncturist, Jocelyn, will be available from Tuesday – Friday, 10 am – 7 pm.

Check our acupuncture service page for details on pricing. We offer package discounts when purchasing six acupuncture treatments and you can use sale gift certificates for her services as normal.

A Message From Jocelyn

Hello, I’m Jocelyn and it is my passion to support you in living the fullest life possible. It is my pleasure to offer services that help you care for your body and mind so you can be the best version of yourself!

I’ve been interested in holistic healthcare since I was about twelve years old and I had my first experience with chiropractic—which is what I was intent on studying until I found out about acupuncture.  My first experience with acupuncture helped me find relief from aches and pains related to a motor vehicle accident.  When I found out that there was a local school, Midwest College of Oriental Medicine (MCOM), I just had to learn more about acupuncture and all the modalities of Oriental Medicine.  After jm headshotcompleting my bachelor’s degree in psychology at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, I went on to complete a second bachelor’s degree in nutrition and a master’s degree in Oriental Medicine from MCOM.

My focus is on you, my patient.  It is my goal to educate, guide, and facilitate treatment to relieve your symptoms, help you to regain your vitality, and prevent sickness and disease before it begins. I can best be described as a general practitioner or family practitioner.  While many find joy in specialization, I love the challenge of diagnosing and treating a wide variety of health concerns.  I love it when I see families pursuing a healthy lifestyle together.  There is strength in unity and just like healthy individuals bring that influence to their families, healthy families have the power to change a whole community.

My treatment style is eclectic because my desire is to find the most effective treatment plan for each person; therefore I will draw from as many tools as I have in my toolbox to reach the goal defined in our treatment plan.  I offer nutritional recommendations, Chinese herbal supplements, vitamin and mineral supplements, acupuncture, and manual therapies.  I welcome you to the healing path and look forward to meeting you soon!

What Does An Acupuncture Therapy Plan Look Like?

Depending on your goals, the depth of the issues you want to resolve, and the intensity of your wellness plan you will find that no two therapy plans are identical.  However, when beginning your work with our acupuncturist, everyone will need to schedule a 120 minute initial visit and a 75 minute follow up visit. In these two first sessions the two of you will put together a detailed evaluation, history and plan with plenty of one-on-one time for questions, education, and treatment. Depending on your needs, there may lots of homework in terms of lifestyle practices and/or several vitamins and herbs to familiarize yourself with taking.

After your initial visits, clients can expect a treatment plan that is more frequent at the beginning. As your body ‘holds the effects’ of the treatments for longer and longer timeframes, the treatments will be spaced further and further apart. In this way your acupuncture plan works with your own healing force to first impact a therapeutic change and then gradually allow your body to maintain a healthy condition on its own. Jocelyn will commonly recommend coming for acupuncture treatments twice a week for 3-5 weeks to gain a healing momentum. That frequency is stepped-down as fast as you are able to remain symptom free without treatment. Once your goals are met, she then recommends staying on a seasonal maintenance plan to maintain a good welleness relationship and keep ahead of any issues before they become more deeply problematic. This maintenance plan is generally three or four visits a year.

How To Make An Appointment

Acupuncture with Jocelyn fits right into Back To Bliss’ regular service offerings. Simply call the front desk, book online, or stop in to set up your initial visit and get started today. All subsequent appointments will be set up based on the plan created on your initial visit.

My Take On Acupuncture

Recently I was asked if I would like to blog, and I was very hesitant about it, but I agreed not knowing what I got myself into. After agreeing, I was asked to write a blog about acupuncture, a million thoughts came into my head regretting what I had just agreed to do.

“Oh no, what did I get myself into?!” “I’m a cosmetologist, I know nothing about acupuncture.”

But after thinking about it, the only thing I knew about acupuncture was the sticking of needles in your body. I had no idea why or where this idea came from. I had no idea what acupuncture is helpful for. So, I immediately got on the computer and started researching, and I was quite surprised as to what I found out. I hope you find my research as interesting as I did.

acupuncture

Acupuncture

Noun |ac·u·punc·ture|:  an originally Chinese practice of inserting fine needles through the skin at specific points especially to cure disease or relieve pain

According to an ABC article, a growing number of Americans would prefer to stop popping pills and avoid going under the knife to treat a bum knee, achy lower back, or sore hip. Instead, they’re turning to the ancient Chinese practice of acupuncture to help ease chronic joint pain. It’s based on the premise that a subtle life energy—or “qi |ch·ee|”—circulates through the 14 major energy channels of the body, known as meridians. The channels are like “roadways” that transport qi to every part of the body, including its internal organs and tissues.

Acupuncture is said to stimulate these meridian points by easing the pressure of the channels and correcting the body’s imbalances by allowing the qi to flow more freely.  Others believe that acupuncture merely stimulates the nerves causing them to release endorphins already found in the body. Elle Woods stated it best in the movie Legally Blonde, “Endorphins make you happy. Happy people just don’t kill their husbands. They just don’t!” Endorphins act as a natural sedative and by stimulating the nerves and releasing these endorphins, patients begin to see a release in pain.

Originally acupuncture needles were not made of stainless steel but of stone, bamboo and bone. Today’s needles are extremely fine in diameter (about the thickness of two human hairs) and are sterile and disposable. So how does it work? Acupuncturists feel your pulse and look at your tongue to gain information about your state of health and plan a course of treatment. It is also highly individualized – for example, if 50 people with the common cold received acupuncture all 50 people could have different acupuncture points chosen as part of their treatment.

Acupuncture has been shown to be effective for the treatment of nausea and vomiting in adults following surgery or taking chemotherapy and postoperative dental pain. It is also effective for

  • osteoarthritis
  • chronic headaches
  • back, neck, and shoulder pain

Practitioners (and patients) have also seen results with a wide range of conditions, including:

  • infertility
  • respiratory and gastrointestinal illnesses
  • insomnia
  • nausea
  • side effects of chemotherapy
  • ADHD
  • mood disorders, such as depression and anxiety.

Personally I am afraid of needles, but if it could help my lower back pain, I will definitely give it a try.

Thanks for reading! I know I found my assignment to be quite eye opening and am glad I took the time to learn about this ancient healing art.

 

xoxo Kylie – Apprentice Stylist

Blogging for Back To Bliss’ Team Journal